Sam and Max Hit the Road

As always, this is full of spoilers!

I think about this game a lot.

I think about how it starts with a woman trying to talk calmly to a man who has tied her up and is threatening to kill her just because she had the temerity to say no and how that’s even more relevant and relatable 26 years later.

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Developing a Reusable Instruction System

I have been working on a library of basic components that is designed to work for many different types of game. It abstracts away platform-specific inputs, converting them into platform-agnostic interactions.

Taking this a step further, I have expanded this into an instruction system that takes advantage of Swift’s features to create an Instruction struct. This struct uses pseudo-English formatting that makes adding actions to entities simple and easy to read:

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Useful Adventure Game Resources: Puzzle Documents

Since I started my series about handling movement, I’ve learned a lot more about Entity Component Systems and I’m changing the way my engine is structured to reflect this.

While this sounds like a Typical Simon Rabbit Hole, it has fundamentally changed how I approach game engine development and I have made some huge strides with very minimal effort. Thanks to the advantages of ECS, some features that I thought would have to wait for many versions down the line have become trivially easy to implement.

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Handling Movement Part 2: Scaling and Z-Positions

In part one, I set up a Movement Component that moved sprites around a space without any regard for the type of scene that they inhabit.

However, many adventure game scenes have some sort of perspective where it’s possible for players to move around an object.

Imagine a game where, say, a character in a trench coat is visiting a square in Lecce, Italy. For some reason, there’s a crate in the middle of it:

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